The Sandy Hook Massacre: There Are No Words

That was the exact sentence I said when someone said we should write about this tragedy. What words are there- words of sympathy? Perhaps comforting quotes of Scripture? Angry lines of rhetoric, bashing back and forth? What does any of this change? These defenseless, innocent children are gone, and for what?

Both sides of the political hoi-polloi are on their soap boxes over the 2nd Amendment.

It seems to be a requirement: if there is a shooting, then before any real facts are known beyond “that someone may be hurt,” and “a fire arm might be the weapon involved,” then the fight over gun control re-ignites with a vengeance.

I’m well aware its human nature to use the hardest hitting tool to make a point, but for once could this not be the tool used? At least let the families mourn, the surviving children not have cameras shoved in their faces, and maybe, just maybe let the facts of the horrific situation be released before turning everything into talking points?

President Obama came out in a touching speech, speaking as a parent stated

“We’ve endured too many of these tragedies in the past few years. And each time I learn the news; I react not as a president, but as anybody else would as a parent. And that was especially true today. I know there’s not a parent in America who doesn’t feel the same overwhelming grief that I do.”

This is exactly what was we needed to hear, and what we all need to be saying. We grieve, together as a nation. And I was very grateful that the president said these moving, heartfelt words.

I was grateful, up until he then said

“As a country, we have been through this too many times. Whether it is an elementary school in Newtown, or a shopping mall in Oregon, or a temple in Wisconsin, or a movie theater in Aurora, or a street corner in Chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods and these children are our children. And we’re going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics.

“Meaningful action?” My gratitude plummeted. It couldn’t be just a “we grieve as a nation”; of course not.

“If now is not the time to have a serious discussion about gun control and the epidemic of gun violence plaguing our society, I don’t know when is,”

This above quote was from Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y. in a statement made today. Mr. Nadler, if you think while the facts are still completely unknown is the time to politicize and discuss gun control; I question more than just your sense of timing.imagesCAA312SK

This Christmas there are several families that will be mourning, not celebrating.

The holiday season will forever be linked in their memories with what happened to their children.

As a nation, we should keep these families in our heart and minds, not turn their grief into a demagogic battleground on gun control.